HIV Advances Bring People Closer To Cure, Struggles Continue

ProjectInform, a San Francisco, CA nonprofit that educates and brings awareness of HIV and AIDS to others in the world, shared a story written on GQ.com in April about a man that gave his 10-month old son at the time a needle filled with HIV-positive blood out of malice towards the child. This story became viral and brought a new outlook into the world of HIV and the stigma it brings alongside its name. However, that same stigma it had in the 1980s still brings a shadow onto society today.

As the world gains more knowledge of HIV and continues to research closer to a cure, the stigma still lives on that causes the virus to continue to live in the shadow it once had in the 1980s during its initial outbreak.

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HIV is more treatable and preventable than ever before in the 21st century. As the years progress, the number of cases grow smaller and smaller. With the drug advances such as the Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) drug Truvada and more awareness brought forth from national nonprofits more than ever before, the spread of the virus is slower than ever. However, the numbers for men-who-have-sex-with-men and minorities continuously stand tall even with many LGBT individuals embracing the advances of such prevention drugs such as Truvada, especially in areas such as the South.

As the United States heads towards a new era of administration with a new President in the new year, would education regarding the virus help further new advances towards a cure? With much of the media attention towards anti-LGBT laws and equality by state, it leaves the real cause of concern ignored in the lives of those living with the virus as well as those at risk. If the government takes a much more directive approach at researching and educating others within society about the virus, research shows that it may build a more proactive approach at prevention, testing, and a positive lifestyle for individuals, especially the youth.

Organizations work harder than ever to build awareness of the virus and help to decrease the number even more for Americans and beyond, but are new advances at educating others needed at this time?

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