“I Hate My Life”: The Story Behind the SC School Shooting

Lilly Chapman, 8, cries after being reunited with her father, John Chapman at Oakdale Baptist Church on Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016, in Townville, S.C. Students were evacuated to the church following a shooting at Townville Elementary School. A teenager opened fire at a South Carolina elementary school on Wednesday. (AP Photo/Rainier Ehrhardt)

Lilly Chapman, 8, cries after being reunited with her father, John Chapman at Oakdale Baptist Church on Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016, in Townville, S.C. Students were evacuated to the church following a shooting at Townville Elementary School. A teenager opened fire at a South Carolina elementary school on Wednesday. (AP Photo/Rainier Ehrhardt)

TOWNVILLE, SC — Our nation encountered countless acts of violence within the past few months, killing innocent victims along the way and causing an uproar for thousands of U.S. citizens nationwide.  However, what is one to think when the victims and assailant are children?  That was the case this past Wednesday when a teenage boy opened fire at a nearby elementary school in the small community of Townsville, SC, injuring a teacher and two other students while uttering the words that is breaking hearts all over:

“I hate my life.”

Many all over the town, the state and the world are wondering why a 14-year-old Honor Roll student in Jesse Osborne would go to the lengths of changing his life forever in committing such a horrendous act of violence?  Just before the shooting at the school, Osborne shot and killed his father, 47- year-old Jeffrey Osborne, at their nearby home.  Calling his grandparents and feeling emotionally distraught, he made his way over to the school as the grandparents made their way to the home to check on the young boy and his father, finding the man dead at the scene as a result.

What may have started this unfortunate set of events was the shooter’s expulsion from West Oak Middle School, where school officials found a hatchet and a machete in his possession.  Osborne stated to them and often complained about being bullied.

Jesse Osborne, 14, is alleged to have murdered his father then gone to the nearest elementary school and shot a teacher and two children  The teenager, of Townville, South Carolina, was expelled from his middle school because he brought a hatchet and machete to class  Detectives looking into whether boy, nicknamed 'Little Jesse' because of his size, was bullied before being expelled His dead father had convictions for domestic violence and drug possession Community is praying for six-year-old Jacob Hall, who remains in hospital on life support after suffering blood loss when he was shot Other wounded six-year-old and teacher  Meghan Hollingsworth are also recovering Osborne will appear in court on Friday, to face allegations that he gunned down his father, who had convictions for domestic abuse, possessing marijuana and had been declared bankrupt, and then targeted the nearby school.

Jesse Osborne, 14, is alleged to have murdered his father then gone to the nearest elementary school and shot a teacher and two children. Detectives looking into whether boy, nicknamed ‘Little Jesse’ because of his size, was bullied before being expelled. (AP Photo/Facebook)

Now, because of the turn of events resulting from his expulsion, two lives are at stake as the teacher, Megan Hollingsworth, and another male student are recovering from their injuries.  Unfortunately for Jacob Hall, the 6-year-old shot in the leg, lost a lot of blood and succumbed to his injuries a few days later.

Lives all over this town will be changed but it goes to show that this could have been prevented.  Speculations are showing that Osbourne’s father was convicted of several domestic and drug possession charges. The community is grieving the loss and from the shock of the entire incident as Anderson County police continue to investigate this matter.

This is another instance where a young child has been bullied in school and, as a result of what seems to be negligence in helping the matter, it caused the end of innocent lives. Several have been angered at this being yet another shooting that the community has to deal with throughout all the incidents of police brutality in the nation, but many are showing why there needs to be further legislation on gun control laws in our nation.

Do you think that this could have been prevented if progressive approaches were taken to stop the bullying towards Jesse?  Gun violence has taken over the nation by storm and taken over the political race as we are weeks away from voting a new president.  However, it does not have to start there.  Many are going out and protesting, but feeling as though that is not enough.  Instead, for the sake of those “little Jesses” or other children out there, groups and individuals must come together and talk to the legislators about changing the laws for their community to make them safer.  Education and forum amongst community members can bring a lot of discussion within the government boards and slowly, if not immediately, evoke that progressive change in the community.

This is yet another tragedy that South Carolinians and those around the nation must come together and heal.  However, the citizens must heal in the right direction by educating and unifying with each other to bring change instead of spreading hate.  Until then, a young life is forever changed as he appears in court for the first time on Friday to face the allegations set before him.

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